CDC Responds to HIV/AIDS

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CDC Responds to HIV/AIDS
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Overview
The Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP)
Other HIV/AIDS Prevention Activities at CDC
CDC's HIV/AIDS Prevention Strategy
HIV/AIDS Funding
Publications of Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention Staff

Overview

As a part of its overall public health mission, CDC provides leadership in helping control the HIV/AIDS epidemic by working with community, state, national, and international partners in surveillance, research, and prevention and evaluation activities. These activities are critically important, because CDC estimates that over one million Americans are living with HIV, and 24 to 27% of these people are unaware of their HIV infection.

In addition, the number of people living with AIDS is increasing, as effective new drug therapies keep HIV-infected persons healthy longer and dramatically reduce the death rate. CDC’s programs work to improve treatment, care, and support for persons living with HIV/AIDS and to build capacity and infrastructure to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and around the world.

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The Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP)

Most of CDC's HIV/AIDS prevention efforts are the responsibility of the Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases (CCID) National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP). Within this Center are the two Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP), charged with the mission of preventing HIV infection and reducing the incidence of HIV-related illness and death.

* The Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention−Intervention Research and Support (DHAP-IRS) provides national leadership and support for HIV prevention research and the development, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based HIV prevention programs serving persons affected by, or at risk for, HIV infection. The five branches that make up DHAP-IRS are as follows:

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The Prevention Program Branch develops, plans, implements, and manages strategies and resources for HIV prevention with state and local public health departments, community-based organizations, and other nongovernmental organizations. Along with these comprehensive public health and private sector partners, the branch implements and monitors programs, policies, and activities in support of efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS.
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The Capacity Building Branch works with partner organizations to strengthen and sustain the capabilities of the HIV prevention workforce of the United States and its territories. The branch does this by ensuring the availability of science-based and culturally appropriate capacity-building assistance, which includes technical assistance, training, information, and technology transfer.
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The Program Evaluation Research Branch evaluates the effectiveness, costs, and impact of HIV prevention interventions, strategies, policies, and programs for improvement and accountability; develops and enhances evaluation methods and systems; and serves as a resource for building evaluation capacity.
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The Technical Information and Communications Branch develops, produces, and disseminates scientific, statistical, visual, and technical communications on HIV/AIDS for public and private providers, persons at risk, and the general public. Key projects include publications development, satellite broadcasts, public awareness campaigns, national conferences, Web sites, exhibits, and CDC-Info, for HIV prevention information.
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The Prevention Research Branch conducts behavioral and operational research to develop, test, and synthesize sustainable interventions to prevent HIV transmission.
* The Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention−Surveillance and Epidemiology (DHAP−SE) provides national leadership for HIV prevention research and surveillance and the development and testing of effective biomedical interventions to reduce HIV transmission and HIV disease progression in the United States and internationally. The purpose of these activities is to guide the development, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based HIV prevention programs serving persons affected by, or at risk for, HIV infection. The five branches that make up DHAP-SE are as follows:
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The Epidemiology Branch designs and conducts epidemiologic, behavioral, and biomedical intervention studies in the United States and internationally to determine risk factors and modes of transmission of HIV infection and to reduce HIV infection and disease progression.
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The HIV Incidence and Case Surveillance Branch conducts a national program of surveillance and research to monitor and characterize the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and its determinants and impact, to guide public health action at federal, state, and local levels. This program includes surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS in collaboration with state and local health departments to provide population-based data for research, evaluation, and prevention at the national, state, and local levels.
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The Behavioral and Clinical Surveillance Branch implements scientifically rigorous HIV research studies and surveillance systems that meet critical local, state, and national HIV prevention needs for characterizing persons who are at risk for HIV infection or who have recently acquired HIV or have HIV-related morbidities. The branch also develops and demonstrates best practices of laboratory and prevention technologies to efficiently move them from development into public health practice.
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The Laboratory Branch supports DHAP’s goals in HIV prevention as they pertain to clinical studies, viral transmission, diagnosis and incidence, intervention research with microbicides, vaccines, and chemoprophylaxis as well as investigates other human and zoonotic retroviruses. The lab also develops new methodologies for HIV detection, quantification, isolation, evolution, animal modeling, and surveillance, including drug resistance.
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The Quantitative Sciences and Data Management Branch. provides statistical, prevention economics, and informatics support for HIV/AIDS scientific and programmatic activities within the division.

View the organization chart for the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.

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Other HIV/AIDS Prevention Activities at CDC

In addition to the Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention, the following CDC offices also provide HIV prevention activities:

* The Global AIDS Program (GAP) helps resource-constrained countries prevent HIV infection; improve treatment, care, and support for people living with HIV; and build capacity and infrastructure to address the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.
* The National Center for Infectious Diseases' (NCID's) Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP) provides leadership in the detection, prevention, and control of HIV infection transmission in healthcare settings, supporting efforts of the US Public Health Service, state and local health departments, hospitals, and professional organizations (worldwide).
* The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s (NCCDPHP’s) Division of Adolescent and School Health supports state, territorial and local education agencies and national non governmental organizations to build the capacity of schools and youth-serving community-based organizations to provide effective HIV prevention education programs. The Division of Reproductive Health conducts epidemiologic, applied behavioral, and operations research on the prevention of HIV in women at risk for both HIV and unintended pregnancy.
* The National Center for Environmental Health’s (NCEH's) Division of Laboratory Sciences, through its Newborn Screening Branch, operates a multicomponent quality assurance program for laboratories testing dried blood spots for HIV antibodies, provides method development and analytical services for the measurement of Zidovudine and other antiretroviral drugs in epidemiological studies, and provides consultative services for emerging concerns in laboratory quality assurance.
* The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) collects a variety of HIV/AIDS-related information in many of its data systems, including data on HIV-related deaths, the use of health services, and HIV knowledge and testing behaviors.
* The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) develops, implements, and evaluates strategies to prevent the occupational transmission of HIV, with special emphasis on personal protective equipment and engineering controls. NIOSH also evaluates organizational and behavioral factors that influence prevention strategies.
* The Office of Workforce and Career Development's Training and Curriculum Services Division strengthens and enhances the community practice of HIV/AIDS prevention through consultation on the development, delivery, and evaluation of laboratory training.
* The National Center for Health Marketing’s (NCHM’s) Division of Public Health Partnerships improves the quality of clinical and public health laboratory testing for HIV/AIDS and other related diseases. Laboratory quality systems experts and experienced laboratory managers in the Division work in collaboration with laboratory scientists and customers to identify weaknesses and improve practices by providing direct technical assistance; developing quality assurance guidelines and standards; and training.

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CDC's HIV/AIDS Prevention Strategy

Over the past two decades, CDC’s HIV prevention activities have focused on helping uninfected persons at high risk for HIV change and maintain behaviors to keep them uninfected. The overarching force behind CDC’s approach to the third decade of HIV prevention is CDC’s initiative Advancing HIV Prevention: New Strategies for a Changing Epidemic. This initiative is aimed at reducing barriers to early diagnosis of HIV infection and increasing access to quality medical care, treatment, and ongoing prevention services for those with a diagnosis of HIV infection.

The initiative emphasizes the use of proven public health approaches to reduce the incidence and spread of disease and capitalizes on new rapid test technologies, interventions that bring persons unaware of their HIV status to HIV testing, and behavioral interventions that provide prevention skills to persons living with HIV.

The initiative consists of four key strategies:

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Making HIV testing a routine part of medical care
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Implementing new models for diagnosing HIV infections outside medical settings
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Preventing new infections by working with persons diagnosed with HIV and their partners, as well as others at high risk for HIV infection
* Further decreasing mother-to-child HIV transmission

For more details about how CDC is responding to the changing HIV/AIDS epidemic, read the report HIV Prevention in the Third Decade.

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HIV/AIDS Funding

In fiscal year 2004, about 88% of DHAP’s HIV-prevention funds were distributed externally through cooperative agreements, grants, and contracts—primarily with state and local agencies, especially health departments.

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Publications of Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention Staff

* 2009 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2008 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2007 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2006 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2005 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2004 Publication List–Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
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* 2003
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 2002
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 2001
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 2000
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 1999
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 1998
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
* 1997
o Intervention Research and Support PDF icon
o Surveillance and Epidemiology PDF icon
 

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